Jaymie Hodara

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My journey into the field of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) originated from a desire to make a meaningful impact. While studying for my Master’s Degree in California, many of the students in my program were behavior analysts, who frequently told stories of success. As I began to explore what behavior analysis was and how it was implemented, I knew it aligned with what I wanted to do.

ABA’s evidence-based and data-driven approach appealed to my analytical mindset. The systematic nature of ABA interventions ensures a comprehensive understanding of behavior. This commitment to rigor and scientific evidence was in line with my need to provide ethical and effective interventions to improve lives.

I knew by studying ABA I would develop a better understanding of why we do the things we do. But what I didn’t know at the time was ABA is not easily accessible worldwide. During my research, I discovered there were no certified behavior analysts in my home country, Jamaica. My research also showed that ABA was the leading treatment for Autism and approximately 600 Jamaican children are diagnosed with Autism each year.

This cemented my commitment to becoming board-certified and practicing ABA in Jamaica. Seeing my clients overcome challenges, develop new skills, and engage more effectively with their environment reinforced my dedication to this field and sparked a new desire to highlight and spread awareness of the profound impact ABA can have on the lives of children with ASD.

Find Jaymie on LinkedIn at Jaymie Hodara BCBA

Certification Level: Board Certified Behavior Analyst
Certification Number: 1-12-12230
Issued: September 2012
  • What is a Behavior Interventionist? A Plain Language Guide

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    Behavior interventionists are an important part of a team that provides behavioral support to families with children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental disabilities. Their role is multifaceted, encompassing both the implementation of evidence-based strategies and developing relationships with key stakeholders. This article aims to provide parents with more information on who a…

  • M-CHAT Screening: 7 Points Parents Need to Know

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    Pediatric healthcare professionals routinely screen for developmental delays at 9-month, 18-month, and 24-month wellness visits. However, they should also be specifically screening for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) at the 18-month and 24-month wellness visits. Several screening tools can be used to determine if children are at risk for developing ASD. One of those tools is…

  • Level 2 Autism Guide: What Parents Need to Know

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    Embarking on the journey of parenting a child with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) can be a challenging and enlightening experience. If you find yourself questioning whether your child may have level 2 ASD or have recently received a diagnosis, it is important to understand that there is tailored support and information available to directly address…

  • The Early Start Denver Model: A Guide for Parents

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    The timing of social communication development can make a big difference for children who are at risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Many parents expect their one-year-old to be talking or saying a few words. However, language gets delayed because the prerequisite social communication skills are delayed or underdeveloped. This is why early intervention is…

  • Autism Life Expectancy: What Parents Need to Know [2024]

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    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a neurological and developmental condition that affects social interaction, communication, and behavior. The abilities of people with ASD vary significantly with some individuals needing a high level of support in their daily lives, and others who can live and work independently or with very little help. According to the World…

  • VB-MAPP Assessments: A Plain-Language Guide for Parents

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    The Verbal Behavior Milestones Assessment and Placement Program (VB-MAPP) is a tool used in Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA). It provides Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) and other educators with an effective way to determine the learning, language, and social skills of children with developmental delays such as Autism. This article will give you a better…

  • 31 Signs of Autism in Babies: What to Look for & When to Ask a Dr.

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    With the increased prevalence of Autism, many parents are keener on monitoring their child’s behavior and developmental milestones from infancy. It can be overwhelming or confusing for parents when their babies miss important milestones, or they begin to notice peculiarities in their behavior. If you type in “signs of Autism” in your search engine, there…

  • Discrete Trial Training: A Complete Guide for Parents

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    The difference between Discrete Trial Training (DTT) and Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA) can be confusing, with some interchanging terms. However, DTT and ABA are not synonymous, rather DTT is a teaching technique based on the principles of ABA and is often used during various therapies and in the educational setting. This article will take a…

  • How to Write a Letter of Medical Necessity for ABA Therapy

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    Securing insurance coverage for certain therapies often requires justifying the need for such services. Despite Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) therapy being a well-established evidence-based treatment approach for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental disorders, insurance companies still require justification due to its intensity and costs. The justification can be claimed in a…

  • ABA Therapy vs Speech Therapy for ASD: Which is Better for My Child?

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    Young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can benefit from different types of early intervention. Two treatment approaches commonly recommended for ASD are Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) and Speech Therapy. While ABA primarily focuses on increasing adaptive behaviors and teaching life skills, it can also encompass communication. On the other hand, Speech therapy directly helps…

  • ABA Therapy for PDA: A “How? When? Why?” Guide for Parents

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    Pathological Demand Avoidance (PDA) is characterized by extreme and persistent resistance to fulfilling typical demands or expectations from authority figures. PDA is largely driven by anxiety, and the resulting behaviors appear to be abnormal and excessive. These behaviors are not a choice, but a pattern of behavior specific to the child’s profile. PDA is closely…

  • ABA Therapy vs CBT for Autism: Which is Better?

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    Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) are both evidence-based best practice treatments for Autism. While there is some overlap in their approaches there are key differences. ABA focuses on analyzing and determining the function of behavior and uses positive strategies to address specific and immediate behavior issues and to teach socially significant…

  • Is ABA Therapy Harmful? A Review of the Evidence

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    Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) stands acknowledged as a scientifically sound and efficient method for imparting skills and addressing behavioral challenges linked to Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Nonetheless, within the realm of ABA, an enduring discourse revolves around the ethical considerations of the practice. The history of ABA includes examples of intensive, repetitive intervention, overuse of…

  • ABA Therapy Age Limits & Age Range Based on Evidence

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    Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) is an effective form of treatment for autism spectrum disorder. While Autism can be detected in children as young as 12 months old, a reliable diagnosis cannot be made until 2 years old. Most children are officially diagnosed by age 3, however, some are not diagnosed until their teen years or…

  • Occupational Therapy vs ABA: 4 Key Differences

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    Specialized therapies are used to minimize the symptoms and maximize the abilities of persons with developmental, emotional, and cognitive issues. Occupational Therapy (OT) and Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) are commonly used therapies that are specifically designed to not only reduce symptoms of various developmental disorders but also teach new skills that will increase a person’s…